It’s About Time by Young The Giant

It’s About Time is the lead single off of Young The Giant’s anticipated second album “Mind over Matter”.Although I’m a huge fan of the band’s even-keeled sound on the first record, I must say that this must more aggressive departure is very welcome.

This track bolts out of the gate with a driving alt-rock drum and bass rhythm, and exquisitely accentuated by a punchy staccato guitar line. All of which provide a galloping feel to the music. This is, until the chorus of the song kicks in and that incredibly tight guitar arpeggio rolls down like rainwater on plate glass. The use of shimmering surf rock guitar tones to soar above the earthier bass sounds gives this track a retrofitted sound that unabashedly steals from the past and twists it into something new.

Once again, lead singer Sameer Gadhia delivers an incredibly clean and crisp performance of the lyrics while retaining control over a broad spectrum of notes, again cementing his place as one of the most underrated frontmen in modern rock (in my opinion, anyway).

I’m unsure whether the rest of the album will be as much of a divergence from the band’s sound on their self-titled debut, but regardless, this is an exciting new song from a band that has a lot of potential

Before Your Very Eyes by Atoms For Peace

Before Your Very Eyes is the opening track on AMOK, the 2013 debut from Atoms For Peace. While the members themselves don’t call themselves a supergroup, many music fans would be particularly inclined to view this band in that way; especially since its members include Thom Yorke of Radiohead, Flea of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, and producer/electronic composer Nigel Godrich. While these three musicians may seem poles apart in terms of genre and influences (and believe me, they are); they come together in a genre-bending chaos of sound that can only be known as Atoms For Peace. There’s too many “real” instruments for this to be strictly electronic music, the beat is too dance-able for it to be ambient, and it’s too ambient to be proper EDM. It is just Atoms For Peace, straight and clean.

Now I must admit, like anything Thom Yorke is involved in, this track can be a bit difficult to accept at first listen. There’s a ton of sound layering going on that warrants at least 2-3 listens before the song really makes an impact (at least in my case). But when this song impacts, it IMPACTS.

This song is nothing short of an aural film. The complex percussion rhythms created by multiple track layering slither like a bed of snakes while the distorted synth and computer soundscrash in sharp, static waves on the warm sandy guitar tones. All the while Yorke’s echo-laden vocal performance acts the siren; sweetly singing lyrics of the vacuous allure of youth and beauty while hinting at the impending prospect of old age that lies in wait. All of these elements homogenize in a way that allows the listener to unfold the sounds they hear; choosing to focus on any of the given tracks to gain a fresh insight into the song.

Now, multiply that by 9 and you’ve got AMOK. A fascinating blend of styles and sounds that sure to please those who like to try and decode songs for their hidden pearls of insight.

Dig Away.

Sixpack by JEFF The Brotherhood

Firstly, apologies to any readers out there who were missing out on the music. Since I’m only one guy, the whole “blogging every day” thing isn’t always possible. But I’m back; so lets get at it:

Sixpack comes to us as the lead single off of JEFF the Brotherhood’s newest album Hypnotic Nights. Blending an infectious indie-rock melody with heavier, edgier grunge tainted guitars, JEFF the Brotherhood bring some much needed loudness to the indie genre, which in my opinion has been a little to heavy on the synth lately. Call me old fashioned.

With a chord progression that would be right at home in a Weezer song, JEFF the Brotherhood demonstrate that they aren’t afraid to utilize offbeat but effective structures in their songs. These two brothers from Nashville, Tenessee may have four studio albums and a great live records from Jack White’s Third Man Records in Nashville, but they have still been able to maintain a freshness to their sound, as demonstrated in this song.

Repetitive? Yes. Derivative? Absolutely. Unoriginal? Arguable. But it sure is a lot of mindless guitar rock fun.